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Curbed LA - All Love where you live

  • Bright Lincoln Heights loft with wall of windows seeks $449K
    by Bianca Barragan on December 7, 2018 at 11:08 pm

    Just over 1,000 square feet of space A short walk away from the Lincoln Heights/Cypress Park Gold Line station, this 1,020-square-foot loft has plenty of space and great natural light, thanks to the original industrial windows running along the east-facing wall of the dwelling. The layout of the house is long and lean with high ceilings, in-unit laundry machines (hidden in a closet), central heating and air, and granite counters in the kitchen. Those industrial windows repeat in the bedroom, which has access to a private balcony. The listings boasts views of the Dodger Stadium fireworks from inside the loft. The residence is located in the Alta Lofts, a 1920-era building redone by architects Brooks + Scarpa. Shared amenities include a landscaped courtyard, a gym, bike storage, and parking. Last sold in 2013 for $335,000, the loft is now listed for $449,000. The HOA fees are $429. 200 N. San Fernando Road, #210 [Jeffrey J. Fritz and Laura Buffone / Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerag […]

  • New Lyft app will give directions to scooters, public transit across LA
    by Alissa Walker on December 7, 2018 at 10:31 pm

    The update is meant to help users plan multimodal trips As Lyft launches e-scooters in Los Angeles today, the ride-hailing company announced it has expanded an app update to help residents find its dockless vehicles and connect to public transit in LA. Users in LA who have updated the Lyft app will see a feature where they can view nearby transit routes with real-time arrival information, as well as the distance to the nearest Lyft scooters, which will start out on the Westside in Venice, Westwood, Sawtelle, Mar Vista, and Brentwood. Lyft Lyft users in Santa Monica can also find scooters and transit stops.Instead of routing a car to the user’s location, typing in a destination will allow users to switch between modes, and provide walking or riding directions to the nearest scooter or transit stop. Lyft Scooters will be shown in Lyft’s app, which will also provide walking directions to the nearest vehicle.The new app feature, originally launched in September as a complement to the rollout of scooters in Santa Monica, marks a notable shift in Lyft’s strategy. Although the startup was purportedly founded with a goal of reducing car ownership, in recent years Uber and Lyft have been blamed for making traffic worse by adding more trips to already-congested cities and taking riders away from transit. Now the ride-hailing company is providing data and access to vehicles that can make it easier for its users to avoid cars altogether. Adding transit and scooters is part of Lyft’s mission to take 1 million cars off the road by the end of 2019, according to a blog post by Lyft co-founder John Zimmer. Recently the company announced that it was offsetting all its emissions with renewable energy in an effort to go completely carbon-neutral. In September, Santa Monica launched its 18-month scooter and e-bike program with recently selected partners Uber, Lyft, Bird, and Lime. It was the second city to debut Lyft’s scooters, which launched in Denver earlier that same month. Lyft also has a permit to deploy e-bikes in Santa Monica, but hasn’t launched them yet. Lyft’s e-scooters and e-bikes will be direct competitors to Uber’s Jump e-bikes, which are also on LA’s Westside now, and Jump scooters, which the rival ride-hailing company debuted in Santa Monica in October. Lyft How the app’s e-bike and transit integration might work, from Lyft’s proposal to the city of Santa Monica.Many trip-planning apps are providing more multimodal information. Uber recently redesigned its app with an option to toggle to “bike or scooter” and plans to add transit and rental car information as well. Trip-planning apps Transit and Citymapper, which already integrate public transit, ride-hailing, and walking directions, have recently added the ability to locate bike and scooter rentals. Transit also recently debuted the ability to coordinate transit itineraries with ride-hailing services. Carter Rubin Lyft scooters on the ground in Santa Monica.Besides making it easier to connect with public transit, Lyft is also partnering with transit agencies. In Santa Monica, Lyft provides $3 late-night rides from Expo Line stations from 8 p.m. to 3 a.m. and the city is mulling replacing three low-ridership Big Blue Bus lines with subsidized Lyft rides as well. […]

  • Here’s what $540K buys around LA
    by Elijah Chiland on December 7, 2018 at 7:58 pm

    See what that price buys in five Los Angeles neighborhoods, from West Adams to Atwater Village Welcome to Curbed Comparisons, where we explore what you can rent or buy for a certain dollar amount in various LA ‘hoods. We’ve found five homes and condos within $10,000 of today’s price: $540,000. Via Sandra Hernandez/Realty Executives United This cozy little Burbank house sits on a narrow 2,970-square-foot lot with a grassy front lawn and a white picket fence to give it a bit of extra homey charm. Inside are two bedrooms and a bathroom, with 684 square feet of floor space. Behind the house is a garage and a storage shed. Asking price is $549,900. Courtesy Compass Realty This upper-level condo is part of the lovely Village Green community in Baldwin Hills. Built in the early 1940s, the complex of garden apartments is both a local and a national historic landmark. This unit has one bedroom and one bathroom, with 1,012 square feet of floor space. The kitchen and bathroom appear to have been recently remodeled and the unit opens to multiple balconies overlooking the community's park-like grounds. Asking price is $535,000, with HOA dues of $433 per month. Via Kathleen Finnegan/Berkshire Hathaway Built in 1923, this Spanish bungalow in West Adams is the recipient of a recent makeover. Its wood floors have been refinished and windows, countertops, and lighting have all been updated. The 852-square-foot house has two bedrooms and one bathroom. It sits on a 3,484-square-foot lot with a small backyard and a detached garage. Asking price is $549,900. Via Jack Der Ashodian/Coldwell Banker This tidy condo in Atwater Village sits in a 1940s complex a block north of Los Feliz Boulevard. The unit has two bedrooms and one bathroom, with 853 square feet of living space. The interior features wood floors and in-unit laundry, with extra storage space and a parking spot included. Asking price is $539,000, with HOA dues of $430 per month. Via Jim Sandoval/Park Regency Realty Here’s a classic 1950s ranch house in Canoga Park with a bit more space than the other options on this list. The 1,349-square-foot home has four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Complete with a white brick fireplace, the living room is illuminated by a long glass sliding door. The classic kitchen appears to have original cabinetry and tile countertops. Sitting on a 7,811-square-foot lot, the house has a large backyard and an attached garage. Asking price is $539,999. Los Angeles Curbed Comparisons [Curbed LA […]

  • Storm drops 3 inches of rain on LA, Downtown record shattered
    by Jenna Chandler on December 7, 2018 at 6:19 pm

    The storm triggered mudslides and flash floods warnings in Malibu A cold rain storm that pummeled Los Angeles this week dumped more than 3 inches of rain on some parts of LA and shattered a record in Downtown Los Angeles. On Thursday, 1.9 inches fell in DTLA, beating a 21-year-old record of 1.01 inches, according to the National Weather Service. That record was set in 1997, when the strongest El Niño in decades ripped through the area, says Weather Service meteorologist Eric Boldt. The two-day total for Downtown was 2.11 inches—close to the neighborhood’s average rainfall for the entire month of December, 2.33 inches. An impressive amount of rain fell elsewhere across the region on Wednesday and Thursday, with the Weather Service recording 3.1 inches in Woodland Hills in the two-day span. Agoura Hills saw 3.6 inches of rain, and Pasadena received 3.9 inches. The rain totals are not entirely surprising given the intensity of the rain. The Weather Service, which recorded rainfall rates of up to a half an inch per hour, had measured more than 2 inches of rain in Agoura by 1 a.m. Thursday. The cold storm dusted the Grapevine with snow, trapped cars in water and debris, and triggered mudslides and flash floods warnings in Malibu and surrounding areas scarred by the Woolsey Fire. Some of the heaviest rainfall hit the Santa Monica Mountains, which were ravaged by the Woolsey Fire, according to Boldt. Flooding is more likely after fires, when burnt debris collects on hillsides and prevents the soil from absorbing the rainfall, and early Thursday morning, downpours sent a deluge of mud onto Pacific Coast Highway, which was closed in both directions from Trancas Canyon Road to the Las Posas. Encinal Canyon and Decker Canyon roads were also fully also closed in both directions. At Burbank Airport, a plane skid off the runway, prompting the airlines to cancel and delay flights. I-5 was closed through the Grapevine as snow blanketed the pass. #TrafficAlert if you are heading to SoCal...@CHPFortTejon says #Grapevine is closed due to multiple crashes and vehicles stuck in the snow. @KSEE24 pic.twitter.com/eygJ1ya637— Joe Moeller (@joemoeller44) December 6, 2018 The storm made a significant impact in a short time. Here are some photos of the damage: Car stuck in morning mudflow along PCH near #Mulholland in #Malibu, driver was ok and this mudflow now almost full cleared @CBSLA pic.twitter.com/eU0EqaUxvS— Kara Finnstrom (@KaraFinnstrom) December 6, 2018 There’s been a #mudslide on Cuthbert Road in the #Malibu Park neighborhood @ABC7 pic.twitter.com/PHf00s0OLv— Josh Haskell (@abc7JoshHaskell) December 6, 2018 Per LASD Reserve Officer Tommy Fakehany:Heavy mud flow at #PCH and Leo Carrillo. All traffic is being turned around and the area is not passable. #malibu #woolseyfire #traffic PC: Tommy Thomas Tommy Fakehany pic.twitter.com/YCj1l6fKPI— Cece Woods (@Cece90265) December 6, 2018 #WoolseyStorm *UPDATE* per @LASDHQ PCH is closed from Busch to the Ventura County Line. Flooding at multiple intersections, crews are in the area working to open lanes. Utilize alternative routes and avoid the area. pic.twitter.com/aYIA8KfIk1— LACounty Fire PIO (@LACoFDPIO) December 6, 2018 Car navigates around large rock on #Topanga Canyon Road. @NWSLosAngeles warns loosened rocks and boulders could tumble down from #WoolseyFire burn scar @CBSLA @DanielleGersh @suzmarques @CBSLAPeter pic.twitter.com/gNEaBL3DVo— Kara Finnstrom (@KaraFinnstrom) December 6, 2018 Mudslide on Morning View drive in Malibu. @latimesphotos @CityMalibu @latimes pic.twitter.com/dYx657NvzM— Katie Falkenberg (@KatieFalkenberg) December 6, 2018 Muddy water pooling up along PCH @CBSLA @DanielleGersh #Malibu pic.twitter.com/EMMxsB4wQt— Kara Finnstrom (@KaraFinnstrom) December 6, 2018 The rain has stopped in the western part of #Malibu - but all that water caused a mudslide on #PCH at #leocarillo state beach - a car is stuck in the mud, told driver is ok. Strong winds in this part of #Malibu right now @ABC7 pic.twitter.com/N2fxfkpht8— Josh Haskell (@abc7JoshHaskell) December 6, 2018 A mudslide in Malibu along PCH near Zuma Beach is cleaned up Thursday morning. @latimesphotos @CityMalibu @latimes pic.twitter.com/YhywR1cAIK— Katie Falkenberg (@KatieFalkenberg) December 6, 2018 Flooding on Country Club Drive in Burbank after the heavy rains this morning. @ABC @BurbankPD pic.twitter.com/Mqh5c8xC8N— Abbey Luck (@abbey_luck) December 6, 2018 […]

  • Bye ‘Blue’ Line, Metro will rename rail lines using letters
    by Elijah Chiland on December 7, 2018 at 6:00 pm

    Each line in the system will be given a letter name, similar to New York City Take the A Train to Long Beach? Metro is on track to give its train and rapid bus lines letter names after the agency's Board of Directors voted Thursday to approve the plan. Right now, most of Metro's lines are named for colors, with the exception of the Exposition Line and the under-construction Crenshaw/LAX Line, which is expected to open in 2020. Those inconsistencies could become more glaring as the agency expands its transit network in coming decades, incorporating new routes and connecting existing ones. Metro staffers had considered giving every line a color name, but found that could eventually get complicated as more routes open (new riders might struggle to find the Green Line on a map that also includes an Olive Line or a Lime Line). Now the agency plans to give each line a letter name and a corresponding color, similar to the New York City subway system (though numbers won't be incorporated in some line names, as they are in New York). A report from staffers acknowledges that many riders will probably continue calling lines by their old monikers, but signs and maps will be changed to reflect the new naming system. For the most part, the current color system will continue to be used, meaning that the Blue, Red, and Purple lines will still appear on maps in those colors. The first line to be renamed will be the oldest in Metro’s rail network: the Blue Line. It will become the A Line once work wraps up next year on a project aimed at speeding up service along the route. Most other lines will switch names once the Crenshaw/LAX Line opens, though the Gold Line will remain as such until Metro's Regional Connector project finishes. At that point, the northern part of the route will become part of the A Line, while the southern leg will link up with the Expo Line (becoming the E Line). According to Metro staff, the name changes will be accompanied by a blitz of publicity alerting riders about the new system. What will Metro call its new train lines? [Curbed LA] Mesmerizing gif shows how much LA’s transit network will grow under Measure M[Curbed LA] The most anticipated transit projects opening in time for the 2028 LA Olympics [Curbed LA […]

Curbed LA - All Love where you live

  • Bright Lincoln Heights loft with wall of windows seeks $449K
    by Bianca Barragan on December 7, 2018 at 11:08 pm

    Just over 1,000 square feet of space A short walk away from the Lincoln Heights/Cypress Park Gold Line station, this 1,020-square-foot loft has plenty of space and great natural light, thanks to the original industrial windows running along the east-facing wall of the dwelling. The layout of the house is long and lean with high ceilings, in-unit laundry machines (hidden in a closet), central heating and air, and granite counters in the kitchen. Those industrial windows repeat in the bedroom, which has access to a private balcony. The listings boasts views of the Dodger Stadium fireworks from inside the loft. The residence is located in the Alta Lofts, a 1920-era building redone by architects Brooks + Scarpa. Shared amenities include a landscaped courtyard, a gym, bike storage, and parking. Last sold in 2013 for $335,000, the loft is now listed for $449,000. The HOA fees are $429. 200 N. San Fernando Road, #210 [Jeffrey J. Fritz and Laura Buffone / Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerag […]

  • New Lyft app will give directions to scooters, public transit across LA
    by Alissa Walker on December 7, 2018 at 10:31 pm

    The update is meant to help users plan multimodal trips As Lyft launches e-scooters in Los Angeles today, the ride-hailing company announced it has expanded an app update to help residents find its dockless vehicles and connect to public transit in LA. Users in LA who have updated the Lyft app will see a feature where they can view nearby transit routes with real-time arrival information, as well as the distance to the nearest Lyft scooters, which will start out on the Westside in Venice, Westwood, Sawtelle, Mar Vista, and Brentwood. Lyft Lyft users in Santa Monica can also find scooters and transit stops.Instead of routing a car to the user’s location, typing in a destination will allow users to switch between modes, and provide walking or riding directions to the nearest scooter or transit stop. Lyft Scooters will be shown in Lyft’s app, which will also provide walking directions to the nearest vehicle.The new app feature, originally launched in September as a complement to the rollout of scooters in Santa Monica, marks a notable shift in Lyft’s strategy. Although the startup was purportedly founded with a goal of reducing car ownership, in recent years Uber and Lyft have been blamed for making traffic worse by adding more trips to already-congested cities and taking riders away from transit. Now the ride-hailing company is providing data and access to vehicles that can make it easier for its users to avoid cars altogether. Adding transit and scooters is part of Lyft’s mission to take 1 million cars off the road by the end of 2019, according to a blog post by Lyft co-founder John Zimmer. Recently the company announced that it was offsetting all its emissions with renewable energy in an effort to go completely carbon-neutral. In September, Santa Monica launched its 18-month scooter and e-bike program with recently selected partners Uber, Lyft, Bird, and Lime. It was the second city to debut Lyft’s scooters, which launched in Denver earlier that same month. Lyft also has a permit to deploy e-bikes in Santa Monica, but hasn’t launched them yet. Lyft’s e-scooters and e-bikes will be direct competitors to Uber’s Jump e-bikes, which are also on LA’s Westside now, and Jump scooters, which the rival ride-hailing company debuted in Santa Monica in October. Lyft How the app’s e-bike and transit integration might work, from Lyft’s proposal to the city of Santa Monica.Many trip-planning apps are providing more multimodal information. Uber recently redesigned its app with an option to toggle to “bike or scooter” and plans to add transit and rental car information as well. Trip-planning apps Transit and Citymapper, which already integrate public transit, ride-hailing, and walking directions, have recently added the ability to locate bike and scooter rentals. Transit also recently debuted the ability to coordinate transit itineraries with ride-hailing services. Carter Rubin Lyft scooters on the ground in Santa Monica.Besides making it easier to connect with public transit, Lyft is also partnering with transit agencies. In Santa Monica, Lyft provides $3 late-night rides from Expo Line stations from 8 p.m. to 3 a.m. and the city is mulling replacing three low-ridership Big Blue Bus lines with subsidized Lyft rides as well. […]

  • Here’s what $540K buys around LA
    by Elijah Chiland on December 7, 2018 at 7:58 pm

    See what that price buys in five Los Angeles neighborhoods, from West Adams to Atwater Village Welcome to Curbed Comparisons, where we explore what you can rent or buy for a certain dollar amount in various LA ‘hoods. We’ve found five homes and condos within $10,000 of today’s price: $540,000. Via Sandra Hernandez/Realty Executives United This cozy little Burbank house sits on a narrow 2,970-square-foot lot with a grassy front lawn and a white picket fence to give it a bit of extra homey charm. Inside are two bedrooms and a bathroom, with 684 square feet of floor space. Behind the house is a garage and a storage shed. Asking price is $549,900. Courtesy Compass Realty This upper-level condo is part of the lovely Village Green community in Baldwin Hills. Built in the early 1940s, the complex of garden apartments is both a local and a national historic landmark. This unit has one bedroom and one bathroom, with 1,012 square feet of floor space. The kitchen and bathroom appear to have been recently remodeled and the unit opens to multiple balconies overlooking the community's park-like grounds. Asking price is $535,000, with HOA dues of $433 per month. Via Kathleen Finnegan/Berkshire Hathaway Built in 1923, this Spanish bungalow in West Adams is the recipient of a recent makeover. Its wood floors have been refinished and windows, countertops, and lighting have all been updated. The 852-square-foot house has two bedrooms and one bathroom. It sits on a 3,484-square-foot lot with a small backyard and a detached garage. Asking price is $549,900. Via Jack Der Ashodian/Coldwell Banker This tidy condo in Atwater Village sits in a 1940s complex a block north of Los Feliz Boulevard. The unit has two bedrooms and one bathroom, with 853 square feet of living space. The interior features wood floors and in-unit laundry, with extra storage space and a parking spot included. Asking price is $539,000, with HOA dues of $430 per month. Via Jim Sandoval/Park Regency Realty Here’s a classic 1950s ranch house in Canoga Park with a bit more space than the other options on this list. The 1,349-square-foot home has four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Complete with a white brick fireplace, the living room is illuminated by a long glass sliding door. The classic kitchen appears to have original cabinetry and tile countertops. Sitting on a 7,811-square-foot lot, the house has a large backyard and an attached garage. Asking price is $539,999. Los Angeles Curbed Comparisons [Curbed LA […]

  • Storm drops 3 inches of rain on LA, Downtown record shattered
    by Jenna Chandler on December 7, 2018 at 6:19 pm

    The storm triggered mudslides and flash floods warnings in Malibu A cold rain storm that pummeled Los Angeles this week dumped more than 3 inches of rain on some parts of LA and shattered a record in Downtown Los Angeles. On Thursday, 1.9 inches fell in DTLA, beating a 21-year-old record of 1.01 inches, according to the National Weather Service. That record was set in 1997, when the strongest El Niño in decades ripped through the area, says Weather Service meteorologist Eric Boldt. The two-day total for Downtown was 2.11 inches—close to the neighborhood’s average rainfall for the entire month of December, 2.33 inches. An impressive amount of rain fell elsewhere across the region on Wednesday and Thursday, with the Weather Service recording 3.1 inches in Woodland Hills in the two-day span. Agoura Hills saw 3.6 inches of rain, and Pasadena received 3.9 inches. The rain totals are not entirely surprising given the intensity of the rain. The Weather Service, which recorded rainfall rates of up to a half an inch per hour, had measured more than 2 inches of rain in Agoura by 1 a.m. Thursday. The cold storm dusted the Grapevine with snow, trapped cars in water and debris, and triggered mudslides and flash floods warnings in Malibu and surrounding areas scarred by the Woolsey Fire. Some of the heaviest rainfall hit the Santa Monica Mountains, which were ravaged by the Woolsey Fire, according to Boldt. Flooding is more likely after fires, when burnt debris collects on hillsides and prevents the soil from absorbing the rainfall, and early Thursday morning, downpours sent a deluge of mud onto Pacific Coast Highway, which was closed in both directions from Trancas Canyon Road to the Las Posas. Encinal Canyon and Decker Canyon roads were also fully also closed in both directions. At Burbank Airport, a plane skid off the runway, prompting the airlines to cancel and delay flights. I-5 was closed through the Grapevine as snow blanketed the pass. #TrafficAlert if you are heading to SoCal...@CHPFortTejon says #Grapevine is closed due to multiple crashes and vehicles stuck in the snow. @KSEE24 pic.twitter.com/eygJ1ya637— Joe Moeller (@joemoeller44) December 6, 2018 The storm made a significant impact in a short time. Here are some photos of the damage: Car stuck in morning mudflow along PCH near #Mulholland in #Malibu, driver was ok and this mudflow now almost full cleared @CBSLA pic.twitter.com/eU0EqaUxvS— Kara Finnstrom (@KaraFinnstrom) December 6, 2018 There’s been a #mudslide on Cuthbert Road in the #Malibu Park neighborhood @ABC7 pic.twitter.com/PHf00s0OLv— Josh Haskell (@abc7JoshHaskell) December 6, 2018 Per LASD Reserve Officer Tommy Fakehany:Heavy mud flow at #PCH and Leo Carrillo. All traffic is being turned around and the area is not passable. #malibu #woolseyfire #traffic PC: Tommy Thomas Tommy Fakehany pic.twitter.com/YCj1l6fKPI— Cece Woods (@Cece90265) December 6, 2018 #WoolseyStorm *UPDATE* per @LASDHQ PCH is closed from Busch to the Ventura County Line. Flooding at multiple intersections, crews are in the area working to open lanes. Utilize alternative routes and avoid the area. pic.twitter.com/aYIA8KfIk1— LACounty Fire PIO (@LACoFDPIO) December 6, 2018 Car navigates around large rock on #Topanga Canyon Road. @NWSLosAngeles warns loosened rocks and boulders could tumble down from #WoolseyFire burn scar @CBSLA @DanielleGersh @suzmarques @CBSLAPeter pic.twitter.com/gNEaBL3DVo— Kara Finnstrom (@KaraFinnstrom) December 6, 2018 Mudslide on Morning View drive in Malibu. @latimesphotos @CityMalibu @latimes pic.twitter.com/dYx657NvzM— Katie Falkenberg (@KatieFalkenberg) December 6, 2018 Muddy water pooling up along PCH @CBSLA @DanielleGersh #Malibu pic.twitter.com/EMMxsB4wQt— Kara Finnstrom (@KaraFinnstrom) December 6, 2018 The rain has stopped in the western part of #Malibu - but all that water caused a mudslide on #PCH at #leocarillo state beach - a car is stuck in the mud, told driver is ok. Strong winds in this part of #Malibu right now @ABC7 pic.twitter.com/N2fxfkpht8— Josh Haskell (@abc7JoshHaskell) December 6, 2018 A mudslide in Malibu along PCH near Zuma Beach is cleaned up Thursday morning. @latimesphotos @CityMalibu @latimes pic.twitter.com/YhywR1cAIK— Katie Falkenberg (@KatieFalkenberg) December 6, 2018 Flooding on Country Club Drive in Burbank after the heavy rains this morning. @ABC @BurbankPD pic.twitter.com/Mqh5c8xC8N— Abbey Luck (@abbey_luck) December 6, 2018 […]

  • Bye ‘Blue’ Line, Metro will rename rail lines using letters
    by Elijah Chiland on December 7, 2018 at 6:00 pm

    Each line in the system will be given a letter name, similar to New York City Take the A Train to Long Beach? Metro is on track to give its train and rapid bus lines letter names after the agency's Board of Directors voted Thursday to approve the plan. Right now, most of Metro's lines are named for colors, with the exception of the Exposition Line and the under-construction Crenshaw/LAX Line, which is expected to open in 2020. Those inconsistencies could become more glaring as the agency expands its transit network in coming decades, incorporating new routes and connecting existing ones. Metro staffers had considered giving every line a color name, but found that could eventually get complicated as more routes open (new riders might struggle to find the Green Line on a map that also includes an Olive Line or a Lime Line). Now the agency plans to give each line a letter name and a corresponding color, similar to the New York City subway system (though numbers won't be incorporated in some line names, as they are in New York). A report from staffers acknowledges that many riders will probably continue calling lines by their old monikers, but signs and maps will be changed to reflect the new naming system. For the most part, the current color system will continue to be used, meaning that the Blue, Red, and Purple lines will still appear on maps in those colors. The first line to be renamed will be the oldest in Metro’s rail network: the Blue Line. It will become the A Line once work wraps up next year on a project aimed at speeding up service along the route. Most other lines will switch names once the Crenshaw/LAX Line opens, though the Gold Line will remain as such until Metro's Regional Connector project finishes. At that point, the northern part of the route will become part of the A Line, while the southern leg will link up with the Expo Line (becoming the E Line). According to Metro staff, the name changes will be accompanied by a blitz of publicity alerting riders about the new system. What will Metro call its new train lines? [Curbed LA] Mesmerizing gif shows how much LA’s transit network will grow under Measure M[Curbed LA] The most anticipated transit projects opening in time for the 2028 LA Olympics [Curbed LA […]

  • Will LA’s housing market cool down in 2019?
    by Elijah Chiland on December 7, 2018 at 4:30 pm

    A new report predicts how much home prices will grow next year Home prices in Los Angeles reached record heights in 2018, climbing to levels far above those recorded in the years leading up to the Great Recession. But price increases have fallen off since summer, and a new analysis from Zillow suggests a cooling trend in the market will continue into the new year. Analysts with the online real estate company surveyed 100 real estate experts across the country on their expectations for 2019. Their responses suggest that home values in Los Angeles will continue to rise next year, but at a significantly slower rate than the nationwide average. The panelists predict that prices will climb 7.7 percent in 2019 across the country; but in the Los Angeles metropolitan area (which includes Orange County), they are expected to tick up 5 percent. Seventeen of 22 experts polled about the LA market said it was likely to “underperform” the nationwide average in terms of home value appreciation That’s partly because prices in Los Angeles rose quickly after the housing bubble of the mid 2000s burst a decade ago. “It’s the markets that experience more exuberance that will then be the first to slow down,” says Skylar Olsen, Zillow’s director of economic research and outlook. Now that median home prices have climbed to unprecedented levels in Los Angeles, many buyers may be priced out of the market, she says. Others may simply bide their time. “We think a big part of it is basically demand exhaustion,” Olsen says. “People can’t just outbid each other anymore.” Jordan Levine, senior economist for the California Association of Realtors, suggests some buyers are hoping prices will suddenly bottom out. “Some folks remember 2008, when prices fell dramatically,” Levine says. “There’s a big consumer confidence element to the housing market. No one wants to be the last one in.” Levine says it’s a mistake to think home values will tank the way they did during the last recession, since mortgage providers are still shying away from the kind of risky home loans that fueled the housing market’s last collapse. More likely, says Levine, is that home values will continue to grow—but at a more modest rate. Olsen agrees. “Really we’re getting back to normal,” she says. “This is actually good news, though sellers probably won’t see it that way.” Buyers might also have a hard time getting excited. As Levine points out, nearly three in four residents of Los Angeles County can’t afford to buy a median-priced home in the area. “There is a limit to how much folks can afford to pay,” he says. “People are actually picking up and leaving.” LA home prices stay put in October [Curbed LA] Good news for LA buyers? The number of homes on the market is way up [Curbed LA] San Fernando Valley home prices cool off after record-setting summer [Curbed LA […]

  • Aerial tram to Dodger Stadium could actually happen
    by Elijah Chiland on December 6, 2018 at 10:34 pm

    Project leaders say the privately funded tram is still on track to open by 2022 Elon Musk has some serious competition in his plans to get Dodger fans to and from games. Metro CEO Phil Washington announced Thursday that the agency had signed a letter of intent with a company called Aerial Rapid Transit Technologies that plans to build an aerial tram running between Union Station and the stadium. The letter will allow the agency to begin negotiations with the company in order to allow the proposal to move forward. ARTT is led by Drew McCourt, the son of former Dodgers own Frank McCourt. The company revealed plans for the project in April, estimating it would cost about $125 million to build. According to Martha Welborne, project manager for the ARTT system, the tram will “have the capacity to move thousands of people every hour.” Welborne said that, if all goes according to plan, the project is on track to open by 2022. The tram would be privately funded and privately operated, but the company has asked Metro to “take the lead role in the procedural requirements for route selection and right of way,” according to a statement from ARTT issued earlier this year. Meanwhile, tech entrepreneur Elon Musk revealed ambitions in August to build an underground transit line to the stadium that would carry riders between the venue and a nearby Metro station on game days. The project is undergoing environmental review. Metro already offers free shuttle service before and after games between the stadium and Union Station, as well as the Harbor Gateway Transit Center. Aerial tram proposed for Dodger Stadium [Curbed LA] Elon Musk’s Boring Company pitches high-speed tunnel to Dodger Stadium [Curbed LA] Dodger Stadium: The ultimate guide to LA’s ballpark [Curbed LA […]

  • In busy Chinatown, 9-story hotel proposed to replace motel
    by Bianca Barragan on December 6, 2018 at 9:42 pm

    The owners are planning a hotel and rooftop restaurant The owners of the Royal Pagoda Motel on Broadway in Chinatown have proposed razing the two-story building and replacing it with a nine-story hotel. The Kwong Family Irrevocable Trust filed plans with the city on Tuesday. The new hotel would measure about 112,000 square feet and feature a rooftop restaurant and lounge. The Royal Pagoda building dates to 1964, according to city records. It sits at the southwest corner of Bernard and Broadway, near the onramp to the 110 Freeway. A representative for the owners did not return a request for comment. Farther north on Broadway, a long and narrow project with 920 housing units is proposed by developers Lincoln Property Company and S & R Partners, which is run by the San Antonio Winery’s Riboli family. The project would rise between Broadway and the Los Angeles State Historic Park. Chinatown as whole is drawing lots of attention from developers. In the last year, a 27-story tower with housing, retail, and office space has been proposed as a replacement for an existing retail center and a 26-story apartment and hotel tower designed by Studio Gang has been put forth on a site occupied by a low-rise building and a former movie theater. Studio Gang unveils its first Los Angeles project: A wavy, 26-story tower in Chinatown [Curbed LA] 27-story tower proposed for Chinatown retail center site [Curbed LA […]

  • Metro CEO supports congestion pricing, free fares on public transit
    by Elijah Chiland on December 6, 2018 at 8:54 pm

    Could tolls on drivers cut down on traffic? The head of Metro endorsed congestion pricing for Los Angeles Thursday, telling the agency’s board of directors Thursday that rush-hour tolls on drivers could fund free fares on public transit. “We think that with congestion pricing done right, we can be the only city in the world to offer free transit service in time for the 2028 Olympics,” Metro CEO Phil Washington said. It’s not clear yet how such a system would work, but if applied across the LA region, it could radically shift the way that people move around the city. Washington suggested that a congestion pricing system would encourage more drivers to take public transit, while cutting down on LA’s notorious traffic. Several board members latched onto the idea, including Los Angeles City Councilmember Mike Bonin, who emphasized the potential environmental benefits of congestion pricing. “We are committing suicide as a species through climate change,” said Bonin. “Anything we do to make driving cheaper and anything that we do to make transit more expensive gets us away from the big issue.” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti also suggested the agency should consider the option. But he acknowledged that charging new fees on drivers in such a car-dependent city would be a political risk. “The moment you say something like congestion pricing,” he said, “there’s probably going to be nothing else in the headlines today.” Washington endorsed the measure while presenting a report on funding options for the agency’s Twenty-eight by 28 initiative, a plan to complete 28 major projects over the next decade. As Washington pointed out, Los Angeles already has a form of congestion pricing in place: Metro’s Express Lanes system, which charges participating drivers varying prices to use dedicated lanes on the 10 and 110 freeways. But on Thursday, Washington laid out options for a far more expansive congestion pricing system. One possibility would be to charge drivers when they pass through a traffic-clogged area—around Downtown or LAX, for instance. Busy corridors could also be targeted for special pricing systems that would kick in when more drivers are on the road. Another option is VMT pricing, which has less to do with traffic conditions and depends more on how far residents drive in a given time period (drivers in this system are charged by the mile). According to Washington’s report, these systems could produce between $12 billion and $104 billion over the next decade, with VMT pricing predicted to be the most potentially lucrative option. Washington suggested that, with fee systems like these in place, Metro could not only speed up eight key projects included in the Twenty-eight by 28 initiative, but could also subsidize fares for riders “forever and ever.” Members of the board said this would be a crucial part of ensuring the success of such a system. “Whenever we are going to be looking at congestion pricing,” said Los Angeles Councilmember Paul Krekorian, “equity demands that there has to be a free or nearly-free alternative.” Board Director Sheila Kuehl was slightly less enthusiastic about the proposal, pointing out that residents in areas poorly served by public transit would be forced to pay more to drive, without being able to benefit from free train and bus rides. Other cities have imposed congestion pricing systems, including London, Stockholm, and Singapore (none offer free transit service). No U.S. city has instituted a region-wide congestion pricing policy, though New York is considering one. Several transit experts spoke to Metro’s board on Thursday about the proposal. Martin Wachs, professor emeritus of urban planning at UCLA, told the board that congestion pricing is the only strategy for reducing traffic “that has been proven to work in every city where it’s been applied.” Why congestion pricing might work in LA [Curbed LA] The most anticipated transit projects opening in time for the 2028 LA Olympics [Curbed LA] How is Metro going to finish 28 projects in 10 years? [Curbed LA […]

  • Parker Center tower slated for complete demolition in January
    by Bianca Barragan on December 6, 2018 at 3:57 pm

    Work is well underway now On Monday, the giant claw of a large piece of machinery tore away at one of the walls of Parker Center, the former headquarters of the Los Angeles Police Department. Parker Center is slowly coming down. Vacant since 2013, it will be cleared out and a 27-story high-rise will take its place, holding offices for city employees and services that are now spread across multiple buildings. Major demolition work on the original eight-story tower, which was designed in 1955 by modernist Welton Becket—whose firm who also responsible for the Beverly Hilton Hotel and the Capitol Records Building—is set to start next month, according to the city’s engineering bureau. For now, the tower’s facades along Los Angeles, Temple, and Judge John Aiso streets remain largely intact. Despite the troubling past of Parker Center—its association with and role in the Watts Rebellion in 1965, the Rodney King riots in 1992, and the 1990s scandal in the LAPD’s Rampart Division—preservationists and the AIDS Healthcare Foundation fought its destruction. Preservationists, including the Los Angeles Conservancy, wanted to renovate and reuse the structure. The AIDS Healthcare Foundation also proposed a plan to preserve the building and repurpose it as housing for the homeless. But in the end, neither group was able to save it. Full demolition of Parker Center is expected to be complete in September 2019, says engineering bureau spokesperson Mary Nemick. Fencing is up at Parker Center, where demolition is getting underway [Curbed LA] AIDS Healthcare Foundation sues LA over Parker Center demolition [Curbed LA] LA OKs plan that would demolish Parker Center [Curbed LA […]

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